The School of Integrated Learning

Middle School 354

Grade 6 Core Curriculum Overview

 

 Grade 6 English Language Arts Overview

 Common Core Code X is the first new, authentic English Language Arts Curriculum that challenges students to read, think, analyze, question, cite evidence, debate, and write every day. Code X was built specifically to address the rigorous demands of the Common Core State Standards and to ensure students become deep readers and measured writers who can translate these skills into success on the Next Generation Assessments.

 Common Core Learning Standards Assessed

vReading

v Writing

vLiteracy

vSpeaking and Listening

vLanguage Acquisition

 

Common Core Aligned Code X Units and Performance Tasks

1. Stories of Survival: In Unit 1, two narrators share the stories of their survival in frightening circumstances. We will study the strategies and techniques these authors use to tell their stories.

Assessment: Write a narrative in which June endures another challenging experience.

2. World Wonders:  In Unit 2, students will consider some of the world’s greatest monuments and the challenges of protecting them.

Assessment: Write an argumentative essay regarding the preservation of the historical Taj Mahal. Use evidence for the text to support your response.

3. Coming to America: In Unit 3, students will read about the challenges immigrants face assimilating to American culture.

Assessment: Write an essay comparing and contrasting the author’s purposes and perspectives. Explain the strategies they use in their writing.

4. Cities of Gold: In Unit 4, students will explore how people describe and convey their feelings about cities. From the poems and the novel excerpt, students will get a clear perspective about the realistic and imaginary cities described.

Assessment: Both passages “Songs of The Buildings” and from the Wonderful Wizard of Oz, express ideas about cities. Write a comparative essay describing how each passage presents the city in similar and different ways.

5. History Lost and Found: In Unit 5, students will explore recent archeological discoveries about ancient Egypt and think about why these discoveries matter. Students will examine the strategies authors’ use to describe the discoveries and how the authors’ perspectives are revealed.

Assessment: Compare and contrast how each writer conveys the historical importance of recent discoveries. Explain how each writer supports his perspective using evidence from the text.  

6. The Big Give: In Unit 6, students will read two pieces of literature: a folktale and a poem. These texts show the reader about how individuals can affect the world around them. By the end of the unit, students will be able to explain the strategies these texts use to show relationships between individuals and the world.

Assessment: Students will write a literary analysis, explaining how the children’s actions, in each scene of Stone Soup, contribute to the development of the plot.

 

Ms. Paradis                                        Ms. Harrison                                          Ms. Skeete

 

 Grade 6 Mathematics Overview

Aligned with the New York State Common Core Learning Standards the curriculum defines what students should understand and be able to do in their study of mathematics. The Standards for Mathematical Content are a balanced combination of procedure and understanding. Expectations that begin with the word “understand” are often especially good opportunities to connect the practices to the content.  Our goal is for students to develop a conceptual understanding in grade specific topics while strengthening their math fluency so that they can navigate the standards for mathematical practice more fluidly. Here at The School of Integrated Learning we integrate the CCLS, rigorous classroom reasoning, extended classroom time devoted to practice and reflection through extensive problem sets, and high expectations for mastery.

Arithmetic Operations Including Division of Fractions

During this module of study, students complete their understanding of the four operations as they study division of whole numbers, division by a fraction and operations on multi-digit decimals.  This expanded understanding serves to complete their study of the four operations with positive rational numbers, thereby preparing students for understanding, locating, and ordering negative rational numbers and algebraic expressions.

Rational Numbers

Students are familiar with the number line and determining the location of positive fractions, decimals, and whole numbers from previous grades. Students extend the number line (both horizontally and vertically) to include the opposites of whole numbers. The number line serves as a model to relate integers and other rational numbers to statements of order in real-world contexts. In this units final topic, the number line model is extended to two-dimensions, as students use the coordinate plane to model and solve real-world problems involving rational numbers.

Ratios and Unit Rates

During the 6th grade students investigate the concepts of ratio and rate. They use multiple forms of ratio language and ratio notation, and formalize understanding of equivalent ratios. Students apply reasoning when solving collections of ratio problems in real world contexts using various tools (e.g., tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, tables, equations and graphs). Students bridge their understanding of ratios to the value of a ratio, and then to rate and unit rate, discovering that a percent of a quantity is a rate per 100. This unit concludes with students expressing a fraction as a percent and finding a percent of a quantity in real world concepts, supporting their reasoning with familiar representations they used previously in the module.

 

Expressions and Equations

Students extend their arithmetic work to include using letters to represent numbers in order to understand that letters are simply "stand-ins" for numbers and that arithmetic is carried out exactly as it is with numbers. Students explore operations in terms of verbal expressions and determine that arithmetic properties hold true with expressions because nothing has changed—they are still doing arithmetic with numbers. Students determine that letters are used to represent specific but unknown numbers and are used to make statements or identities that are true for all numbers or a range of numbers. They understand the relationships of operations and use them to generate equivalent expressions, ultimately extending arithmetic properties from manipulating numbers to manipulating expressions. Students read, write and evaluate expressions in order to develop and evaluate formulas. From there, they move to the study of true and false number sentences, where students conclude that solving an equation is the process of determining the number(s) that, when substituted for the variable, result in a true sentence. They conclude the unit using arithmetic properties, identities, bar models, and finally algebra to solve one-step, two-step, and multi-step equations.

Area, Surface Area, and Volume Problems

In this unit, students utilize their previous experiences in order to understand and develop formulas for area, volume, and surface area.  Students use composition and decomposition to determine the area of triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons.  Extending skills from previous modules where they used coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points on a coordinate plane, students determine distance, perimeter, and area on the coordinate plane in real-world contexts.  Next in the unit comes real-life application of the volume formula where students extend the notion that volume is additive and find the volume of composite solid figures.  They apply volume formulas and use their previous experience with solving equations to find missing volumes and missing dimensions.  The final topic includes deconstructing the faces of solid figures to determine surface area.  To wrap up the unit, students apply the surface area formula to real-life contexts and distinguish between the need to find surface area or volume within contextual situations.

Statistics

In this final unit, students move from simply representing data into analysis of data.  Students begin to think and reason statistically, first by recognizing a statistical question as one that can be answered by collecting data.  Students learn that the data collected to answer a statistical question has a distribution that is often summarized in terms of center, variability, and shape.  Throughout the unit, students see and represent data distributions using dot plots and histograms.  They study quantitative ways to summarize numerical data sets in relation to their context and to the shape of the distribution.  As the unit comes to a close, students synthesize what they have learned as they connect the graphical, verbal, and numerical summaries to each other within situational contexts, culminating with a major project.

 

Ms. France                                Ms. Lindsey                                    Ms. Simpson

Ms. France                                               Ms. Lindsey                                                   Ms. Simpson                                             

 

 

Grade 6 Social Studies Overview

 

The development of the regions primarily in the Eastern Hemisphere. We begin with the Paleolithic Era, which occurred from 2.6 million years ago to about 12,000 years ago. We then move into the Neolithic Revolution and focus on humans passing the threshold of systematic and sustained agricultural societies that leads into the major ancient river valleys civilizations. From there we will discuss major belief systems and the classical civilization of the region. Finally, we end the year with the formation of the Byzantine Empire and Islamic Caliphates. The Grade 6 cohorts will also have the opportunity to partake in global action activities through UNICEF that will provide current events connections and modern-day realities of the regions through discussions and debate.

 

Selected ReadingsStudents will not receive a textbook, however will be responsible for a series of readings every unit. The readings will be distributed at the beginning of every unit and there will be a set due date for the questions and an exam based on the content of the readings. Students will only receive one copy of the readings per unit. The readings will be posted on the Schoology website as well. Students can access the readings on the site if they forget or misplace their copy. Students are required to complete and review their notes using the Cornell Note-Taking System modeled in class daily at home. 

 

Comon Core Learning Standards for History

Social Studies Common Core Aligned State Grade 6 Units

1. Reading in History: Reading complex texts including primary and secondary documents

2.      Writing in History: Comprehensive written portfolio pieces for each unit, research projects, and personal arguments.

1.      The Geography of the Eastern Hemisphere

2.      The First Humans, Neolithic Revolution, and the Early River Valley Civilizations

3.      Comparative World Religions

4.      Comparative Classical Civilizations in the Eastern Hemisphere

5.      The Mediterranean World and Interactions Across the Eastern Hemisphere

 

Ms. Rizvi

Ms. Rizvi

 

Grade 6 Science Overview

From the Desks of Mrs. McLaren, Ms. Greenidge, and Ms. France

To the Students and Parents of Grade Six.

Re. Science Curriculum

 

 

Introduction

Science relies on logics and creativity. Science is both a body of knowledge and a way of knowing how the world works. As young scientists you will be involved in challenging activities that will help you understand the everyday relevance of science and your everyday life. This course incorporates a student-centered, problem-solving approach to science. Students will use scientific inquiry to pose questions, seek answers and develop solutions. Students will learn through hands on activities including field trips, laboratory investigations, projects, modeling, problem solving and other strategies as needed as we progress.

 

Unit 1 Energy and Simple Machines

 The study of energy will provide a better understanding about its various forms, transformations, and uses. Students should be able to design systems that will demonstrate the use and transformation of energy. As they continue exploring the concept of energy, students will know the application of potential, kinetic and mechanic energy through simple and complex machines. Students should be able to design a complex machine that will use at least one form of energy, and should be able to explain such energy transformations.

Unit 2 Weather and The Atmosphere

The unit studies physical properties of matter, energy transformations, as well as how energy is released or absorbed as light and as heat. This will provide a context for how weather conditions are produced in the atmosphere, and how weather events affect life in specific regions. Students may build tools to investigate weather in their local area, gathering and analyzing patterns and trends to describe weather conditions, make informed predictions, and explain hazardous weather conditions.

Unit 3 Diversity of life

Diversity of life is seen through the study of cells. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and animal and plant cells, are observed to describe their structure and to explain how these cells make different organisms. Students will understand how cells are the primary source for biodiversity, and will learn to classify organisms according to similarities and differences at the cellular and organism level, as well as using internal and external structures in living things. Students will also study how different organisms have different energy needs to live. They will understand that energy moves through ecosystems in one direction, usually from the Sun, through producers to consumers and then decomposers, in which its balance is the result of interactions between living and nonliving things. Students will be able to construct models of biomes and/or ecosystems they investigate and that will visually represent their explanation about how energy is used and transformed by different organisms in an ecosystem.

Unit 4 Interdependence

This unit continues the study of ecosystems and how living things interact with all physical factors in their living environment. Each ecosystem has its own set of environmental conditions that determine biodiversity. Climatic factors, competition among populations, and changes in environmental conditions help maintain a balance in the growth of certain populations. All living things have adaptations that enable them to live within ecosystems under specific environmental conditions. Abrupt changes in the environment will make living things change, adapt, or migrate, in order to preserve life

 

Mrs. McLaren                                       Ms. Greenidge                                          Ms. France

 

The School of Integrated Learning

Middle School 354

7th Grade Curriculum Overview

 

Grade 7 English Language Arts Overview

Our scholars delving deeply into the Common Core aligned Scholastics curriculum known as Code X. The academic program (Code X) provides students the opportunity to focus on vocabulary, comprehension, writing, and performance tasks, designed not only to engage students in Close Reading and daily writing about complex nonfiction and contemporary literature, but to assist with the development of essential reading and writing skills. 

 Common Core Learning Standards Assessed

Ø  Reading

Ø  Writing

Ø  Literacy

Ø  Speaking and Listening

Ø  Language Acquisition

 

Common Core Aligned Code X Units and Performance Tasks

Unit 1: Mapping Your Life: In the text, Call Me Maria by Judith Ortiz Cofer and the poem “A Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost, readers explore what it is like to be faced with important decisions and how these decisions affect a person’s life.

Writing Performance Task: Write a story if an important event or decision; it can be real or imagined. What understanding or insight did this experience reveal?

Unit 2: Sports Report: In the article “What Could Be Better Than a Touchdown?” By Kelefa Sannah and Why We Run by Bernd Heinrich, readers explore the idea that for athletes, mental determination can play as crucial a role as physical prowess.

Writing Performance Task: “Sport Performance has just as much to do with mental strength and agility as with physical prowess”. Develop or refute this claim in an argumentative essay.

 Unit 3: Your Right Your Vote: In the play “Twelve Angry Men” by Reginald Rose and the poems “Democracy” by Langston Hughes and Sara Holbrook, authors explore issues of justice, equality and the role of the individual in a democracy.

Writing Performance Task: Compare and contrast two writer’s perspective on democracy. Analyze the strategies they use to convey their perspectives.

Unit 4: Nature’s Fury: Through the presentation of data and the recounting of personal experiences, author Sebastian Junger (the Perfect Storm), Jacqualine Adams, and Ken Kostel (“Super Disaster of the 21st Century), show how natural disasters can impact the world.

Writing Performance Task: Compare and contrast the strategies and techniques that each author uses to describe the cause and effects of disasters. Consider text structure, choice of vocabulary and use of data and details.

 Unit 5: Stolen Childhood: In the selections, Rabbit Proof Fence by Doris Pilkington and Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo, readers will discover the challenges some typical, some horrendous – of young people growing up during different times in history.

Writing Performance Task: Analyze which author conveys s the challenges faced by the people or main characters most successfully. Consider the narrative techniques and strategies that the authors use.

Unit 6: America Speaks: Poets Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes and Julia Alvarez and author Cynthia Kadohata, share their vision of American identity, through there literary pieces.

Writing Performance Task: These writers claim a specific vision of what it means to be an American. Compare and contrast their perspectives, referencing their literary devices and figurative language.

Unit 7: A Better World: Author, Jeffery Sachs, of The End of Poverty and Renee Carver of“Saving the World One Click at a Time” use reasons, facts and evidence to construct arguments about causes of and solutions to poverty.

Writing Performance Task: Trace the authors’ line of arguments regarding effective ways to fight poverty. Evaluate the specific claims, distinguish which claims are supported by reasons, facts and evidence, and which are not.

Grade 7 Math Overview

Aligned with the New York State Common Core Learning Standards the curriculum defines what students should understand and be able to do in their study of mathematics. The Standards for mathematical content are a balanced combination of procedure and understanding. Expectations that begin with the word “understand” are often especially good opportunities to connect the practices to the content. Our goal is for students to develop a conceptual understanding. In grade specific topics while strengthening their math fluency, so that they can navigate the standards for mathematical practice more fluidly. Here at the School of Integrated Learning we integrate the CCLS, rigorous classroom reasoning, extended classroom time devoted to practice and reflection through extensive problem sets, and high expectations for mastery.

Ratios and Proportional Relationships  

Students build reasoning of ratios and rates to formally define proportional relationships and the constant of proportionality.  Students explore multiple representations of proportional relationships by looking at tables, graphs, equations, and verbal descriptions.  Students extend their understanding about ratios and proportional relationships to compute unit rates for ratios and rates specified by rational numbers. The unit concludes with students applying proportional reasoning to identify scale factor and create a scale drawing.                   

The Number System

Students build on their understanding of rational numbers to add, subtract, multiply, and divide signed numbers. Previous work in computing the sums, differences, products, and quotients of fractions serves as a significant foundation.  Real-life situations are represented by the sums and differences of signed numbers. 

Geometry

This unit consolidates and expands upon students’ understanding of equivalent expressions as they apply the properties of operations to write expressions in both standard form and in factored form.  They use linear equations to solve unknown angle problems and other problems presented within context to understand that solving algebraic equations is all about the numbers.  Students use the number line to understand the properties of inequality and recognize when to preserve the inequality and when to reverse the inequality when solving problems leading to inequalities. They interpret solutions within the context of problems.  Students extend their previous knowledge of geometric figures and the relationships between them as they apply their work with expressions and equations to solve problems involving area of a circle and composite area in the plane, as well as volume and surface area of right prisms. 

Expressions and Equations

Students deepen their understanding of ratios and proportional relationships by solving a variety of percent problems. They convert between fractions, decimals, and percent’s to further develop a conceptual understanding of percent and use algebraic expressions and equations to solve multi-step percent problems. An initial focus on relating 100% to “the whole” serves as a foundation for students.  Students begin the module by solving problems without using a calculator to develop an understanding of the reasoning underlying the calculations.  Material in early lessons is designed to reinforce students’ understanding by having them use mental math and basic computational skills. To develop a conceptual understanding, students use visual models and equations, building on their earlier work with these.  As the lessons and topics progress and students solve multi-step percent problems algebraically with numbers that are not as compatible, teachers may let students use calculators so that their computational work does not become a distraction. 

Statistics & Probability

Students begin their study of probability, learning how to interpret probabilities and how to compute probabilities in simple settings.  They also learn how to estimate probabilities, which can be proven by observations or experiment. Probability provides a foundation for the inferential reasoning developed in the second half of this module.  Additionally, students build on their knowledge of data distributions that they studied in Grade 6, compare data distributions of two or more populations, and are introduced to the idea of drawing informal inferences based on data from random samples.

 Grade 7 Science Overview

Introduction

Science relies on logics and creativity. Science is both a body of knowledge and a way of knowing how the world works. As young scientists you will be involved in challenging activities that will help you understand the everyday relevance of science and your everyday life.

This course incorporates a student-centered, problem-solving approach to science. Students will use scientific inquiry to pose questions, seek answers and develop solutions. Students will learn through hands on activities including field trips, laboratory investigations, projects, modeling, problem solving and other strategies as needed as we progress.

Unit 1 Geology

This unit studies the surface of planet Earth, as well as the natural phenomena that causes the surface to change over time. Students will be able to make different types of models representing the lithosphere that will best help them describe changes in the surface of the planet. In addition, they will analyze data from earthquakes and volcanoes, and charts that represent the long history of Earth, drawing conclusions about how these forces of nature provoke short-term, long-term, and permanent changes to the surface of the planet.

Unit 2 Energy and Matter

Students will describe matter by its physical properties and will explain its behavior by using its chemical properties. Knowledge of physical and chemical changes will enable students to understand how matter and energy interact in many dynamic ways. As students understand these interactions between matter and energy, they should also be able to investigate and explain how pollutants enter and remain in the environment, and its consequences for living and nonliving things. Students should be able to propose ideas and ways to preserve a healthy living environment with a minimum amount of pollutants.

Unit 3 Dynamic Equilibrium: The Human Animal

Through this unit, students will understand the cell, the function of organs, and how these work together as a system. Students must be able to explain and conclude that, despite changes, the connection of organ systems, and the maintenance of a proper metabolism, will provide a dynamic equilibrium for life

Unit 4 Dynamic Equilibrium: Other Organisms

This unit continues building understanding of the structure and function of other organisms, by exploring body systems of plants and other animals, including single-celled organisms and invertebrates. Students will compare and contrast how these organisms regulate and maintain homeostasis, drawing conclusions about their physical needs and how they maintain a dynamic equilibrium. [Refer to Appendix A for the Humane Treatment of Animals and Conservation Day]

 Grade 7 Social Studies Overview

 Course Overview: This course covers the first half of United States History, from the Native American cultures present before the European colonization of the Americas to the Civil War (1400-1865). We begin with the North American regions and the cultures that had already been established long before the European colonists arrived. We will also spend some time discussing misconceptions about this time period and discovery. From there, we will move into the era of British colonialism focusing on the formation of the thirteen colonies and the subsequent rising tensions between the American colonists and the British Crown, which eventually culminated in the American Revolution. Next, we spend a great deal of time on the formation of government and law in the newly formed United States of America, focusing on origins, The Articles of Confederation, U.S. Constitution, landmark Supreme Court Cases. In the spring, we will begin our focus on the westward expansion and reform movements from 1800-1860. Finally, we end the year with the national divide over the institution of slavery, the election of Abraham Lincoln, and the Civil War. We will utilize Unit 7 and Unit 8 from The Big History Project in conjunction with the first unit of the U.S. I Curriculum.

Selected Readings: Students will not receive a textbook, however will be responsible for a series of readings every unit. The readings will be distributed at the beginning of every unit and there will be a set due date for the questions and an exam based on the content of the readings. Students will only receive one copy of the readings per unit. The readings will be posted on the Schoology website as well. Students can access the readings on the site if they forget or misplace their copy.

Cornell Notes System: Students are required to complete and review their notes using the Cornell Note-Taking System modeled in class daily at home.

The table below provides a quick overview of the units studied in Grade 6 and Grade 7 Social Studies. Grade 6 focuses on the development of the Eastern Hemisphere in the Afro-Eurasian region until 1450 C.E. Grade 7 delves into the colonization of Western Hemisphere and is mainly centered around the development of the United States of America until the end of the American Civil War in 1865.

Common Core Learning Standards for History

Social Studies Common Core Aligned State Grade 7 Units

1. Reading in History: Reading complex texts including primary and secondary documents

2.      Writing in History: Comprehensive written portfolio pieces for each unit, research projects, and personal arguments.

1.      Native Americans, Early Encounters, and Colonial Development

2.      The Road to Independence

3.      A New Nation: The United States Constitution

4.      A Nation Grows: Expansion and Reform 1800-1860

5.      A Nation Divided

*This course covers the first half of the U.S. Regents content*

 

The School of Integrated Learning

Middle School 354

8th Grade Curriculum Overview

 

Grade 8 English Language Arts Curriculum Overview

Our eighth graders will be engaged in a two pronged academic program which includes Scholastic Common Core Code X. This is a new comprehensive English Language Arts Curriculum for middle school that challenges students to read, think, analyze, synthesize, question, cite evidence, debate, and write every day. Code X was built specifically to address the rigorous demands of the Common Core State Standards, and to ensure that students become deeper readers and measured writers who can translate these skills into success on the next generation assessments. The Scholastic Common Core Code X units are as follows:

Unit 1: College 101

●     Students will examine how teens set themselves apart to get into colleges, and consider what will be necessary for success as higher education evolves to meet the future.

Unit 2: Survivor

●     Students will discover how authors develop characters with the strength to survive extreme environments.

Unit 3: Heroism/ Poetry

●     Students will analyze how poets draw real world connections to address social issues.

Unit 4: Designing the Future

●     Students will interpret magazine articles and book excerpts to describe the qualities that make a winning technology team.

Unit 5: Space Invaders

●     Students will study and examine Science fiction text to see how characters react when faced with adversity.

Unit 6: Children of War

●     Students will analyze book reviews and memoirs that illustrate that children who grow up in violence can sometimes become adults who seek only understanding and peace.

Unit 7: Do the Right Thing

·         Students will read excerpts that share the stories of individuals who grew up on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement and demonstrated the strength of character needed to change the world.

 Social Studies Overview:

Students will engage in the New York State curriculum, which covers New York State and U.S History. Students will be completing discipline specific reading and writing activities that are aligned to the Common Core. Students will gain content from the Industrial Era to the present. This curriculum offers a full year of instruction, designed around the following units:

Unit 1: Slavery in America

Unit 2: Opening the West

Unit 3: An Industrial Society

Unit 4: The U.S. in an Increasingly Independent World

Unit 5: The United States Between the Wars

Unit 6: The United States Assumes Worldwide Responsibilities

Unit 7: Changing Nature of the American People: WWII-Present

Unit 8: Exit Projects

 Living Environment Regents Overview:

 This Living Environment Regents course of study will focus on understanding important biological relationships, processes and mechanisms, and the application of biological concepts. Students will be involved in challenging activities that will help them understand the everyday relevance of science.  They will learn how to apply scientific ideas and processes as they make evidence-based decisions about issues.  Students are required to complete an end of year Science Fair project along with, hands-on laboratories & investigations, projects, small- and large-group discussions, simulations, role-plays, readings, and finally written and oral presentations. 

This year Eighth (8th) Grade will be exploring:

Living Environment Curriculum

Unit 1: Ecology

●       Principles of Ecology, Communities, Biomes, and Ecosystems, Population Ecology, Biodiversity, and Conservation

Unit 2: The Cell

●       Chemistry in Biology, Cellular Structure and Function, Cellular Energy, and Cellular Reproduction

Unit 3: Genetics

●       Sexual Reproduction and Genetics, Complex Inheritance and Human Heredity, Molecular Genetics, Genetics and Biotechnology

Unit 4: History of Biological Diversity

●       The History of Life, Evolution, Primate Evolution, and Organizing Life's Diversity

Unit 5: The Human Body

●       Integumentary, Skeletal, and Muscular System, Nervous System, Circulatory, Respiratory, and Excretory Systems, Digestive and Endocrine Systems, Human Reproduction and Development, and The Immune System

Laboratory Requirements: Critical to understanding science concepts is the use of scientific inquiry to develop explanations of natural phenomena. Therefore, as a prerequisite for admission to the Regents examination in the Living Environment, students must have successfully completed 4 NYS mandated labs and 1200 minutes of laboratory experience with satisfactory written reports for each laboratory investigation.

Promotion:

In EIGHTH GRADE STUDENTS MUST PASS BOTH CLASSWORK, HOMEWORK, STATE EXAMS, and SOCIAL STUDIES EXIT PROJECT (in lieu of a state exam) FOR PROMOTION TO HIGH SCHOOL